holy-hoop
currentsinbiology:

Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients
For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised intracranial pressure. The results of a systematic review of 10 recent studies of what many emergency physicians regard as a “wonder drug” are published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine.




"Apprehension for many years about ketamine’s effects on blood pressure or injured brains inhibited its use for intubation, especially in North America compared to Europe, but our review shows those concerns are likely overblown," said lead study author Corinne Hohl, MD, of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. "In view of recent concerns about the potential negative effects of an alternative induction agent, etomidate, ketamine should be considered routinely in patients with life-threatening infections and more regularly for patients who have been ‘found down,’ or unconscious, before being transported to the ER."

Lindsay Cohen, Valerie Athaide, Maeve E. Wickham, Mary M. Doyle-Waters, Nicholas G.W. Rose, Corinne M. Hohl. The Effect of Ketamine on Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.06.018

currentsinbiology:

Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients

For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised intracranial pressure. The results of a systematic review of 10 recent studies of what many emergency physicians regard as a “wonder drug” are published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

"Apprehension for many years about ketamine’s effects on blood pressure or injured brains inhibited its use for intubation, especially in North America compared to Europe, but our review shows those concerns are likely overblown," said lead study author Corinne Hohl, MD, of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. "In view of recent concerns about the potential negative effects of an alternative induction agent, etomidate, ketamine should be considered routinely in patients with life-threatening infections and more regularly for patients who have been ‘found down,’ or unconscious, before being transported to the ER."

Lindsay Cohen, Valerie Athaide, Maeve E. Wickham, Mary M. Doyle-Waters, Nicholas G.W. Rose, Corinne M. Hohl. The Effect of Ketamine on Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.06.018

kushandwizdom
You may not be her first, her last, or her only. She loved before she may love again. But if she loves you now, what else matters? She’s not perfect—you aren’t either, and the two of you may never be perfect together but if she can make you laugh, cause you to think twice, and admit to being human and making mistakes, hold onto her and give her the most you can. She may not be thinking about you every second of the day, but she will give you a part of her that she knows you can break—her heart. So don’t hurt her, don’t change her, don’t analyze and don’t expect more than she can give. Smile when she makes you happy, let her know when she makes you mad, and miss her when she’s not there.
Bob Marley (via kushandwizdom)